PMB

majiinboo:

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $200,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 

(via loveyourchaos)

Anonymous asked: Hi! The vegans I always see on the Internet & in " real life " are always slim, I myself am slim, but I don't see how someone could become an overweight vegan? I'm honestly curious and this question isn't meant to offend or piss anyone off, I promise! I really do like your blog and hope you can answer as to how one could be a " fat " vegan. x ~*~

fatassvegan:

I’m a fat vegan because I eat people who ask me this question.

No but seriously… I’m like 1000% sure this is a troll but… I know there are a lot of kids on this website and some of them are following me, so for their sake I want to explain something that I hope sticks with all of them, because if you can wrap your head around this now it’ll save you a lot of bullshit later in your life…. No one owes you an explanation about their body. Whether it’s skinny or fat, no one has to explain to you why they are the way they are. And to those of you who will have your weight questioned in your life, you do not have to justify yourself to anybody. You do not have to come up with an excuse or a reason why your body is the way that it is, no matter what weight you are. Even if they don’t mean “to offend” or they’re just “honestly curious,” you don’t have to explain shit to them. It’s your body and you are not required to justify how much space it takes up. (And you’re also not required to be nice about it.)

The other reason I decided to publish this instead of delete it is even though I’m sure this is a troll, this is real shit that fat vegans deal with all the time, and it’s always been a huge turn off for me in the vegan community. People question your legitimacy as a vegan, they question your diet, they question whether or not you actually know what veganism is. They ask you really invasive questions, call you a liar, expect you to have some kind of justification for why you’re allowed to be fat and vegan. And by people I mean usually other vegans, which is such a shame because veganism should be a movement that everybody feels comfortable participating in. I think a lot of vegans don’t want to accept that there are fat vegans (and trust me there are in fact a lot of fat vegans) because then they can’t tote veganism as this magical weight loss cure anymore and use it to fat shame people into going vegan. Then they have to tell people to go vegan for the other billion other reasons why it’s a good idea, instead of just making people feel bad about themselves.

So in conclusion,  I don’t care how nicely you try to frame this question, it’s not an okay question to ask anybody. And if you do it again, I’m going to sneak into your house at night and fart on all your pillows.

fire-dad:

seelywights:

Riley always checks to see if you are as happy to go on a walk as she is 💖

I understand this dog on a spiritual level.

(via bestrooftalkever)

mermaidinamanhole:

If Kristen Stewart can lose her job, risk losing her entire career, fanbase, and respect over cheating on her boyfriend, the fact that Chris Brown is still acknowledged and celebrated is a fucking crime. If you want a prime example of women’s inequality in the media, there it is.

(via dryadgoddess)

Death threats drive Anita Sarkeesian from her home

(Source: clockworkgate, via angry-hippo)

maya-contreras-ddd:

Throwback Thursday: in story form.
My mother had a jewelry studio. It was in the garage of our house in Albuquerque, New Mexico. After school I would sit on the steps just inside the studio and listen to the conversations my mom, Dan, and Doc would have. Dan and Doc both worked for my mother. They seemed like brothers than friends. They bonded over the difficultly of quitting smoking, a love of metal music, and political debating. All of these conversations took place as they cut copper, lit the welding torch, soldered the metal, pickled and buffed the jewelry. On one particular day after school I sat listening to a song and its lyrics: “If you like to gamble, I tell you I’m your man,
You win some, lose some, all the same to me,
The pleasure is to play, makes no difference what you say,
I don’t share your greed, the only card I need is
The Ace Of Spades”. 
I said to Dan and Doc “oh I like this song. Who is it?” Dan and Doc both stopped what they were doing. “It’s Motörhead” they said simultaneously and incredulously. “Teresa why does Maya not know who Motörhead is?!” My mom smiled “she is more into R&B”.  I smiled and said “I like this song. I want to know more about this music.” Doc and Dan gave me a quick overview of rock and metal. I asked them how they knew each other- I loved they way they wove there conversations together. Doc said, “We’ve known each other since ‘Nam.’ Doc was Vietnamese, Dan was a Vietnam soldier. As I continued to come in everyday after school to talk to Dan and Doc I realized they were both amazing people who were hurt, scarred, traumatized. They were both victims of a war that neither wanted any part of. They were suppose to be enemies and yet they were the same. They were brothers- victims of other peoples greed and ideologies. I learned so much from them. It was Dan that told me “Led Zeppelin, listen, you’ll love it.” I did. I do. It was Doc that showed me to forgive but never to forget, “or else we will repeat the same mistakes over and over and over again.”
We do. And I wish we didn’t.

maya-contreras-ddd:

Throwback Thursday: in story form.
My mother had a jewelry studio. It was in the garage of our house in Albuquerque, New Mexico. After school I would sit on the steps just inside the studio and listen to the conversations my mom, Dan, and Doc would have. Dan and Doc both worked for my mother. They seemed like brothers than friends. They bonded over the difficultly of quitting smoking, a love of metal music, and political debating. All of these conversations took place as they cut copper, lit the welding torch, soldered the metal, pickled and buffed the jewelry. On one particular day after school I sat listening to a song and its lyrics: “If you like to gamble, I tell you I’m your man,
You win some, lose some, all the same to me,
The pleasure is to play, makes no difference what you say,
I don’t share your greed, the only card I need is
The Ace Of Spades”.
I said to Dan and Doc “oh I like this song. Who is it?” Dan and Doc both stopped what they were doing. “It’s Motörhead” they said simultaneously and incredulously. “Teresa why does Maya not know who Motörhead is?!” My mom smiled “she is more into R&B”. I smiled and said “I like this song. I want to know more about this music.” Doc and Dan gave me a quick overview of rock and metal. I asked them how they knew each other- I loved they way they wove there conversations together. Doc said, “We’ve known each other since ‘Nam.’ Doc was Vietnamese, Dan was a Vietnam soldier. As I continued to come in everyday after school to talk to Dan and Doc I realized they were both amazing people who were hurt, scarred, traumatized. They were both victims of a war that neither wanted any part of. They were suppose to be enemies and yet they were the same. They were brothers- victims of other peoples greed and ideologies. I learned so much from them. It was Dan that told me “Led Zeppelin, listen, you’ll love it.” I did. I do. It was Doc that showed me to forgive but never to forget, “or else we will repeat the same mistakes over and over and over again.”
We do. And I wish we didn’t.